User or audience? Tailor your campaign to the behavior

Posted on July 28th, 2009 by | Filed under: Integrated Marketing
B-to-B Trade Ad

B-to-B Trade Ad

You’re about to launch a marketing campaign. You know the creative is on target, you know your message is compelling. You want an integrated, cross-media campaign. So, just take that ad creative and repeat it throughout your media mix and, voilá, we’re integrated! … Right?

A common but costly mistake.

While a good campaign has a distinctive look and memorable hook, the actual message must be optimized for each medium. For example, the most powerful and effective creative for a magazine ad can make for an ineffective email. This is due to the radical changes in audience mindset between the various media experiences.

When I’m paging through a magazine, I welcome ads that entertain and captivate me. If I receive an email with that same message, however, it could be an unwelcome intrusion in my in-box that has no value to me. With the same message, a marketer can score a favorable impression in one medium and completely turn off their target audience in another.

Response-Driven Email

Response-Driven Email

The passive medium of print begs for arresting creative, and in today’s world of shrinking print volumes it may be even more effective than ever. In the participatory world of online media, however, you are speaking to your audience in a completely different social context. The audience is actively engaged. They are in task mode. Social media is where they connect themselves to subjects of interest, and email is where they take action.

Think first about the purpose and context of each medium—Web sites, blogs, magazines, billboards, email, postal mail, T.V., social media—and then ask what value you need to bring to each. In going through this mental exercise, you may spark some promotional ideas that work better in the active media.

Tailoring your campaign for channel behavior can add promotional muscle to your offline efforts, and creative punch to your online communications.